the power of affirmations.

For those of you who missed it, I’ve recently begun seeing a counselor on a regular basis. Counseling, in my opinion, has gotten a bad rap. You hear that someone is seeing a counselor and you immediately assume he or she is either battling a porn addiction or so depressed even this can’t help.

[Disclaimer: Should my terribly dry sense of humor be offensive to you, please know that I am NOT suggesting that depression be taken lightly. If you are clinically depressed, especially if you feel strongly that you want to hurt yourself or those around you, please know that your condition should be taken seriously and you deserve to be helped.]

I assure you — neither is the case for me. Rather, I believe that anyone who has spent five minutes on this broken earth trying to interact with other imperfect people can benefit from counseling and should, finances and time permitting, actively seek it out.

My counselor’s name is Dr. Maki. She is a bit older, and she’s refused to dye her hair anymore as a physical representation of her acceptance of her own body. This gives her a lovely grey-to-black ombre style. She has big, kind eyes that, when focused on you, seem to be searching your soul for answers. She wears a ring on each finger, each with a different but equally emboldened stone. She is, based on the three sessions I’ve had so far, simply wonderful.

Two weeks ago, when I saw Dr. Maki last, I was in a very bad way. I hadn’t slept in weeks and was battling such real and crippling anxiety I was literally vibrating uncontrollably. I couldn’t even handle my day-to-day activities. I had to call in to work. I was losing control of everything.

[Side note: Later that night I put 2 and 2 together to figure out that my Mirena IUD was causing these symptoms and I made an appointment the next day to have it removed. I have since gone back to my old self. But. That's another blog post entirely.]

When Dr. Maki asked me what ran through my mind when I was battling the insomnia, I told her that, really, nothing was going through my mind at all. I wasn’t thinking anxiety-inducing thoughts. The insomnia was a side effect of the jitters from my IUD as opposed to something caused by a racing mind. But the thing I did keep thinking over and over was this:

“Why can’t I sleep like a normal person? Why am I so broken?”

As I spoke these words, tears sprang to my eyes and rained down my burning cheeks. I truly wanted the answer to that.

“Why am I so broken?” I repeated, hoping she could enlighten me. She took one of her many rings off and handed it to me.

“This ring is broken,” she said.

I examined the ring — a lapis lazuli stone in a beautifully intricate silver setting. Nothing about it looked broken to me. I pulled it closer to my cloudy eyes and tried to make out any flaw.

“If you look closely, you can see a little black crack that has been mended by a jeweler,” she continued.

As she said that, my eyes found what she was referring to. The slightest dark mark showing that the stone was, indeed, broken.

“Every morning when I put that ring on, I say to myself, ‘I am not broken. I am perfect just the way I am.’ For now, I want you to wear it and say the same thing.”

My eyes shot up from the stone to meet her gaze. “Really? You want me to wear your ring?”

“Yes,” she reassured. “For as long as you need. I’ll get it back. Someday. But you need it right now.”

To be real with you guys, I felt so weird about it. But I did it.

“I am not broken,” I said with a smile I couldn’t contain. “I am perfect just the way I am.” And I slipped the ring on my right ring finger.

not_broken_ringI’ve put that ring on every day since then, keeping my promise to Dr. Maki to repeat the affirmation each time. It has gotten less and less weird with the dawn of each new day and, believe it or not, has even become something I actually believe.

Because this has been working so well for me, I decided to try it with something else I put on each morning — my wedding rings. Now, whenever I put those on, I say to myself, “I am loved.”

I am not broken. I am perfect just the way I am. I am loved.

It is my firm belief that the truth sounds the most beautiful when it comes from within yourself.

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11 Comments

Filed under life, psychology, transformation

11 responses to “the power of affirmations.

  1. mom

    Excellent post, wonderfully written and touches me right here (pointing to my heart). I like your doctor. A LOT. ;-)

  2. Fantastic post!! And aye, going to a counserlor is a wonderful descision that shows strength, not “weakness” as so many view it. You realize you are in a place you don’t want to be, and that doesn’t have to be something like suicidal depression, just a state in life you want to change, and you need some extra help to see things from another perspective and to gain a little guidance, listen to some new ideas from someone detached from the issue- that is fabulous! Dr. Maki sounds wonderful! I am glad the affirmations are helping! Beautiful!! Love this, well done!! Cheers,

    Autumn Jade

  3. Loved this :) As a sufferer of anxiety myself, I can relate. Funny too that you mentioned the Mirena causing the anxiety. I had one for over a year and often wonder if it set me up for a lot of what I went through afterward, once it was removed (depression, anxiety, severe mood swings)…interesting. Thanks for sharing!

  4. Lindsay, I LOVE this post. Love the honesty, love your writing, love the way it felt like you were telling a story. I felt like I was sitting across from you at Red Eye instead of on the other side of a computer. What a positive message. (And a cool counselor!) And I really enjoy the last line about the truth.

  5. Beautiful. I am studying to be a counselor just like the one you see. What a gift. Love it.

  6. Reblogged this on leaf strewn girl and commented:
    Beautiful and heroically written.

  7. Pingback: things i love thursday! (december 6, 2012) | fueled by diet coke

  8. This is beautiful. It brought tears to my eyes. I am so glad that you were able to find that within yourself.

  9. Pingback: three things i learned from counseling. | fueled by diet coke

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